The Christmas Princess by Arthur M. Jolly

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About The Play


The Coop Theater (Santa Monica, CA). Photo by Alex Moy.

Fairy Tale.  60-80 minutes (flexible).  4-5+ males, 4-8+ females (8-25 performers possible, including a size and gender flexible ensemble of dancers).  Suitable for middle school and older. 

Premiered at The Black Box Theatre (Santa Monica, CA), with a later revival and then a subsequent production at The Promenade Playhouse.

Printed Script:  $7.50 (contains special author commentary)Digital Perusal Script: $6.95.   Performance Royalties: $65.00/performance.  Production Photocopy License:  $40.00 (PDF file that may be printed/copied for your cast/crew; must be purchased in conjunction with Performance Royalties)Classroom Photocopy License:  $75.00 (PDF file that may be printed/copied for closed classroom study only).  Limited Video License:  $70.00 (permission to record your production with limited distribution; must be purchased in conjunction with Performance Royalties).  Professional rights should be negotiated directly with YouthPLAYS at info@youthplays.com.  Need detailed help?  Click on Place an Order and then look for the blue What Do I Order? button!

Synopsis


The Coop Theater (Santa Monica, CA). Photo by Alex Moy.

It's Christmas Eve - and the palace is in turmoil. The next day is not only Christmas, but the wedding day of the beautiful (but spoiled) Princess and the handsome (but dumb as a bag of rocks) Prince Valiant.  The problem:  the Princess doesn't want to marry a stupid prince.  Desperate to find a way out of the marriage, she disguises herself as a maid, and seeks the advice of Watt the Witch, who sends her on a quest to find three magical gifts that will allow her to escape her wedding.

Read An Excerpt

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Did You Know?


Hal Corley became a playwright after an acting debut in The Taming of the Shrew wherein he threw a pitcher of water at Glenn Close's Kate for an entire summer; alas, he missed her at half the performances.